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We're updating some of our styles...read on!

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We're updating some of our styles...read on!

Hi folks! Here at Redthreaded we're always striving to improve, and so we are making some changes to a few of our stock corset styles. These changes will be in effect on all new stock purchases going forward. Sale listings may or may not have the updates.  All front-opening busk styles (1860's, 1880's, S-Bend, Titanic styles) Will no longer have a busk underlap. This change is more in keeping with construction seen from the time periods. Will have a slightly more flexible busk. However, these busks are made of better quality steel, and feel more like the busks in our...

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The Making of the Ironwork Gown Pt. 4 - Assembly & Conclusion

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The Making of the Ironwork Gown Pt. 4 - Assembly & Conclusion

Part Three According to my notes, I began sewing actual seams ten days before the Gala. The bodice applique wasn't even done yet. I know.   Actual assembly of this gown was quite straightforward, and I banked upon that fact. I have worked with deadlines like this before. I knew I could just about make a gown like this in a week, but I cut it very close. It helped that I was aiming for a visual replica. I serged seam allowances and machined as much as I could. My reasoning was that true historical accuracy went out the window...

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NEW PATTERN: 1780's Front Lacing Stays

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NEW PATTERN: 1780's Front Lacing Stays

Our #1 pattern request ever is now available in digital and printed form. HOORAY! The pattern includes an optional stomacher, and features alterable side and center back seams. The front lacing means very easy dressing without help.  Individually sized patterns are available here on the website, digital patterns are on our Digital Etsy Shop. This style also works well with Synthetic Whalebone. Read about how to convert our patterns from steel to synthetic here. While this post was written with our earlier Georgian stays pattern in mind, the same concepts apply to the 1780's pattern.

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The Making of the Ironwork Gown Pt. 3 - The Applique

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The Making of the Ironwork Gown Pt. 3 - The Applique

Part Two This is the part that everyone asks me about--the appliqué. The biggest problem to solve with the appliqué was the transfer of the motif to the velvet. I have Michaela de Bruce to thank for sharing the technique she used for her Elsa cape. She used spray adhesive to fix printed templates to the backing of heat-n-bond, and then cut all layers. I had to get more full scale copies printed, but it was by far the simplest and fastest method of transfer.   APPLIQUÉ TUTORIAL My appliqué process went like this: Cut all gown panels in silk...

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The Making of the Ironwork Gown Pt. 2 - Digitizing & Patterning

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The Making of the Ironwork Gown Pt. 2 - Digitizing & Patterning

Part one I knew that a digitized motif would be best, but I had absolutely no experience with any computer drafting or vector program. I planned to outsource this part of the project. Two commissions fell through before I gave up and did it myself. I googled “open source Illustrator,” downloaded Inkscape, and learned some extremely basic techniques. DIGITIZATION TUTORIAL Here is the crash-course process which allowed me to digitize the bulk of the motif in a single afternoon. I will not get into the specific mechanics of these steps—there are already tutorials and program help guides for that. But...

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